Estuary Art and Ecology Prize

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Malcolm Smith Gallery, Howick photo courtesy of artsdiary.co.nz

On Saturday I judged the 12th edition of the Estuary Art and Ecology Prize at Uxbridge Art and Culture’s Malcolm Smith Gallery. More info on the prize can be found here and some local press coverage here. Here are the four winning works from the finalists in the exhibition. More images are available here from artsdiary.

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Marion Wassenaar, ‘Unplugged’ (First) photo courtesy of artsdiary.co.nz

 

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Wei Lun Ha, ‘Colours That I Wouldn’t Want to See’ (Second)
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Mish O’Neill,  ‘Manawa’ (Merit)
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Michelle Farrell, ‘Restore Me Said the Water’ (Merit) photo courtesy of artsdiary.co.nz

Weekend Reading

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A new acquisition for my collection, this 1928 Martin Hürlimann photograph of the Chinese fishing nets at Fort Kochin, leads to news from the Indian Express on the Keralan government’s decision to fund the restoration of the nets, a key tourist driver for the state.

Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa curator of historical photography Lissa Mitchell writes on Louisa Herrmann, owner of the Herrmann Photography Studio, one of Wellington’s most successful studios of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Here’s an interview with filmmaker Jodie Mack on Radio New Zealand’s Standing Room Only programme and another, a joint interview with filmmaker Fern Silva, at Circuit. Jodie was visiting New Zealand in support of the Free Radicals: Cinema on the Wrong Side of the Tracks exhibition and her own survey in the Len Lye Centre cinema, Glitch Envy.

Jack Hitt at the New York Times on the missing James Joyce scholar John Kidd.

David Smith at Jacobin on the depth of George Orwell’s socialist politics.

And the return of The The.

 

3 Essays on Imagereality

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Last year I had the new experience of being asked to write an endorsement for a colleague’s new book. That was Nicolas Pillai’s Jazz as a Visual Language: Film, Television and the Dissonant Image. It was nice to be asked again not long after to do the same for Scott Navicky’s new novel 3 Essays on Imagereality. Here’s what I contributed for the back cover followed by a précis of the work:

“3Essays on Imagereality is the photographic picaresque: a world of image-multiplicity, failed theory and a 24-hours reflecting on the image, the truth and the knuckleball within the walls of the museum.” – Paul Brobbel, Len Lye Curator at the Govett – Brewster Art Gallery

Haunted by photography and fueled by failure, Carlos Spencer-Bayard is an insomniac anythingarian boozehound, who is known to his friends and family simply as “Ghost.” A keen observer of the strangemotion of his own mind, he spends his days engrossed in the daily demands of parenting (i.e. liontaming), but at night, when the noose of nightmadness tightens and the turtle of thought is flipped onto its back, he wrestles with Imagereality. Understanding Imagereality is no easy task, as images are everywhere; and wherever images go, imagetheory must follow. Thus an imagethinker is a scholar of the cultural kitchen sink: nothing is verboten. Shakespeare’s Sonnets and potential self- slaughter, Gnostic intoxication, Gérard Depardieu’s inexplicable sex appeal, Talkreality (also known as Squawkreality), drag queens, author photos, absinthe, and endlessnessnessness: everything is permissible under Imagereality’s spectacular perspectival sun.

More info from the publisher, Montag Press and you can order from Amazon.

 

Weekend Reading

Just back from Melbourne after a quick two-day trip to attend the opening of Antipodean Emanations: Cameraless Photography from Australia and New Zealand at Monash Gallery of Art. Curated by the MGA, the exhibition takes over from the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery’s 2016 exhibition Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph (curated by Geoffrey Batchen) and considers cameraless photography from this part of the world in more detail.

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ANTIPODEAN EMANATIONS, Monash Gallery of Art

You can see from the image above that Len Lye is a strong feature, as he did with the earlier Emanations (serving as the starting point for the whole project). The MGA’s exhibition casts a wider net for artists working with cameraless photography from Australia and New Zealand, including many not seen in the earlier exhibition and many others represented by different or more examples of their work. A few examples can be seen here. I’ll write in more detail on this in a separate post. I’d expect a fair few reviews of the exhibition to turn up in coming months. Here’s the first, from Anna Dunnill at Art Guide Australia.

The publication by Geoffrey Batchen, Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph continues to accompany the exhibition is its present form. A recent review has been published by CAA from Australian reviewer Natalya Hughes.

While I was in Melbourne I was able to make the last days of Runes at the Centre for Contemporary Photography. Curated by Justine Varga and Geoffrey Batchen, this was great to see alongside Emanations at the MGA as it included a few works from the Brewster’s earlier Emanations. Irrespective of that connection, this small exhibition was a fascinating group of photographs and the notion of readability.

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RUNES, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne.

I also had a little time to see the NGV Triennial which recently received a miserable review from the Australian, similar in tone to recent articles in the UK from Tiffany Jenkins. A more positive review is here from the Guardian.

 

 

Apparitions: the photograph and its image

This week the Adam Art Gallery at Victoria University (Wellington) opened the exhibition Apparitions: the photograph and its image (14 October – 17 December 2017). Curated by Geoffrey Batchen and Victoria University art history honours students, the exhibition considers the reproducibility and circulation of photographic images during the early years of the medium. What you see on display in Apparitions is a diffuse reading of the photograph through the 19th century, largely through engraving and lithographs produced after a photographic source.

The first objects you seen in the exhibition are a series of 19th century copies of the Portland Vase by Josiah Wedgwood and Sons Ltd. It’s a clever conceit. Thomas Wedgwood (1771-1805), one of Josiah’s four sons, was an early pioneer of photography and his father’s efforts to copy the famed object demonstrate the industry and commerce that was similarly involved in the development of photography.

One of the key works in Apparitions is Noël Marie Paymal Lerebours’ publication Excursions daguerriennes: vues et monuments les plus remarquables du globe (1841-1864). Lerebours (1807-1873) was a Parisian optician involved in popularising the daguerreotype technique, reproducing images of monuments and landscapes from around the world made using this new technology. The unique nature of each daguerreotype image made them unsuitable for easy or large scale reproduction so Lerebours’ developed a technique of tracing the image from a daguerreotype onto paper for transfer to an engraving plate. Soliciting images from daguerreotypists, Lerebours was able to promote the exciting new view of the world captured by this new photographic technology in numerous volumes of the Excursions daguerriennes.

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Frédéric Goupil-Fesquet, ‘Beirut’ (1840), from ‘Excursions daguerriennes’

One photograph from my own collection was included in Apparitions, a 1840 view of Beirut by Frédéric Goupil-Fesquet (1806-1893) and appears in Excursions daguerriennes. This photograph is notable for several reasons. It is recognised as the first photograph to document Beirut and is one of the few photographs published by Lerebours to acknowledge the photographer as a author of the image.

Being so far removed from the localities of 19th photographic innovation, New Zealand is a difficult place in which to mount such an exhibition. However, loans from the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, the National Library of New Zealand and Auckland Museum illustrate there is a surprising depth to New Zealand’s photography collecting. Batchen’s previous exhibition, Emanations: the art of the cameraless photograph, similarly brought together a wealth of photographs one wouldn’t expect to find so close at hand from Australasian collections, proving that New Zealand audiences can see some expertly produced exhibitions given the right attention and resourcing.

Weekend Reading

Dayanita Singh is interviewed here discussing her Pocket Museum publication, a miniature version of the Museum Bhavan exhibition published by Steidl.

Some listening for a change. Last month 95bFM broadcast an interview with Erika Balsom as part of their Artbank programme. Balsom is Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at King’s College London and was visiting New Zealand as part of the Govett-Brewster At Gallery’s International Film Curator in residence programme. Balsom covers her visit to New Zealand (and Australia) in this month’s Art Monthly magazine (unavailable online).

There’s a lot of talk around Alexander Calder lately, principally around he Whitney Museum’s exhibition, Calder: Hypermobility. This piece from Hyperallergic covers the performative aspect of Calder’s motor driven works in the Whitney show. The article includes several videos from the Whitney’s channel which lead me on the Calder Foundation’s own videos. Here’s Calder Foundation chairman and grandson of Calder, Alexander S. C. Rower, demonstrating motion in Calder’s work.

The other exciting news in the Calder world is Jed Perl’s new biography, an excerpt  published here by the Smithsonian.

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WYNDHAM LEWIS: A BATTERY SHELLED (1919)

The Imperial War Museum North’s Wyndham Lewis exhibition gets a review in the London Review of Books, reviewer Jon Day observing Lewis’ best work was his war paintings:

‘In fact, the pictures are still shocking: war gave Lewis a subject which was equal to his anger. He pays as much attention to the angle of a rack of shells as he does to the bodies of the men around them. Unlike some of his peers, he wasn’t interested in the dynamism of war – there are no explosions, his war paintings are strangely static. Nor did the war do much to strip him of the schoolboyish contrarianism of Blast. But it did give him a way of applying Vorticism to the real world, providing a context for what Read called ‘the geometry of fear’. Lewis’s work can still feel more modernist than any of his peers.’

Weekend Reading

Controversy this week in Australia over the awarding of the Olive Cotton Award for Photographic Portraiture to Justine Varga for a cameraless photograph produced by the action of the artist’s grandmother writing and spitting on to the negative. The Sydney Morning Herald lead the charge with a couple of pieces and plenty of quotes from disgruntled photographers – their main criticisms here. They raise the question of whether the work is a photograph, whether it’s a portrait, and finally if it was even authored by the artist. With those issues hanging over it, it’s a wonder why the bile hasn’t been more directed to the awards organisers for including the work rather than the typical sexist dismissal of the artist on social media and the hate mail (!) to judge and NGA curator Shaune Lakin. Check out photographer Jack Picone’s social media discussion on the matter to see responses from the dead heart of Australian photography – at best, it’s surprising how few professional photographers can define a photograph.

Hyperalleric reposted an article on Duchamp’s Optical Experiments, something I’m thinking over a bit this week as we install our next Len Lye exhibition at the Govett-Brewster, considering the famous 1961 exhibition of kinetic art Rörelse i konsten/Bewogen Beweging which included the likes of Lye and Jean Tinguely alongside Duchamp. More in this in the coming weeks.

And to end, Jerry Saltz likes the new MoMA renovations.