Weekend Reading

This week I’ve been starting to work in earnest on a forthcoming exhibition concerning experimental cinema so it was timely to see  the Village Voice wrapping up with a great interview with filmmaker and critic Jonas Mekas.

Still in film, the British Film Institute has launched a the BFI Filmography which boasts of being ‘a complete history of UK feature film, explorable and shareable’.

There’s been lots of noise in recent about the Barbican’s exhibition Basquiat: Boom For Real. The two reviews that caught my attention most were from Waldemar Januszczak (‘shallow, uneducated, disingenuous’) and Michael Glover (‘fame-frothy noise and visuals’). Edward Lucie-Smith is kinder to the exhibition. Laura Cumming says it’s charming. Looking at the gift shop offerings, you can choose from a range of Basquiat triptych skateboards (open edition) for a touch under 400 quid  (wheels are extra). Surely the most bizarre exhibition gift shop merchandise ever devised!

Meanwhile (enjoying my Mondrian and De Stijl socks I bought recently from the Stedelijk) I read Nina Siegal’s account of a fake Mondrian and the fraught issues of expertise and authentication.

Staying with museums, Xavier Salomon recently followed in the footsteps of D. H. Lawrence, tracing the writer’s steps in his travel account Etruscan Places (1932). Recounting Lawrence’s perspectives on Etruscan art and civilisation Xavier recalls the following opinion on museums:

‘Museums anyhow are wrong. But if one must have museums, let them be small, and above all, let them be local. Splendid as the Etruscan museum is in Florence, how much happier one is in the museum in Tarquinia, where all the things are Tarquinian, and at least have some association with one another, and form some sort of organic whole’
NSRW_Etruscan_Vases.jpg
Etruscan vases

 

And in the spirit of museums being wrong, this is why I avoid things like ‘ask a curator’ day and twitter back and forth with the public.

 

 

The Long Dream of Waking: New perspectives on Len Lye

The last year has been very productive in terms of publishing and research. Beside overseeing the long overdue publication of Robert Graves and  Len Lye’s 1941 essay Individual Happiness Now, I was thrilled to be have the opportunity to bring together Lye’s photogram work in the Shadowgraphs publication. On the research front, I’m eagerly awaiting the publication of a co-authored essay concerning the conservation of kinetic art through the Getty Conservation Institute and presently working on another co-authored piece concerning Lye’s experimental cinema and advertising.

The big event of the year however is a new collection of writing on Lye arriving in November 2017, published by Canterbury University Press and edited with Wystan Curnow and Roger Horrocks. I’ll follow with more detail once we have a press release in hand but, for now, here’s the cover (a 1979 portrait by Robert Del Tredici) and a list of contributors.

LYE_Cover and spine

 

The Long Dream of Waking features contributions from the following: Scott Anthony (Nanyang Technological University), Geoffrey Batchen (Victoria University Wellington), Paul Brobbel (Govett-Brewster Art Gallery/Len Lye Centre), Rex Butler (Monash University, Melbourne), Wystan Curnow (Len Lye Foundation and Professor Emeritus of the University of Auckland), Sarah Davy (Len Lye Foundation and Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision), A.D.S. Donaldson (National Art School, Sydney), Alla Gadassik (Emily Carr University of Art and Design, Vancouver), Shayne Gooch (University of Canterbury), Malcolm le Grice (Professor Emeritus of the University of the Arts, London), Roger Horrocks (Len Lye Foundation and Professor Emeritus of the University of Auckland), Aaron Kreisler (University of Canterbury), John Matthews (Len Lye Foundation), Peter Selz (Emeritus Professor of the University of California, Berkeley), Luke Smythe (University of Otago, Dunedin) and Evan Webb (Len Lye Foundation).